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10/07/2010

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Prof Ira

Thank you, Brian, for your kind words. I wish you much success on the bar exam!!!

Brian

Professor, I am a student of your bar lectures on trusts and wills and wanted to show my appreciation for your blog. All the best.

Ira Shafiroff

Part of the problem is that Jesus was a Jew who, essentially, taught Judaism. His movement, such as it was, was made up of Jews and only Jews, who headed the movement (e.g. Peter and James). After the fall of the Temple and Jerusalem, Gentiles took over the Church. This change in leadership and membership had a profound effect on the teachings of the Church.

If you truly are interested in this, I hope you will continue to engage. Oh, by the way, please leave at least a first name and not the name of your business. This blog is for people, not businesses.

Shalom.

Ira

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I was raised in a Christian home, but left a number of years ago. I was finding it harder and harder to justify the teachings of the church with what Jesus taught (or rather what the Christian Bible says he taught). I realized at an early age that Jesus was NOT Christian, He was Jewish and worshipped and lived as a Jew. He did not have a New Testament to follow.

Ira Shafiroff

Thank you for reading my blog, Barbara. I do wish to disagree with you though, with respect to, "If we just put our faith in God, good things will happen." That is simply not the case in all circumstances. The freewill exercised by evildoers can do horrible things to even those of faith. The Holocaust is the grandest--that is worst--illustration of this. Do you have an answer? I would love to know. Thank you, again, for your comment. I hope to hear from you. Ira

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Nicely said Ira. God is good. If we just put our faith in God, good things will happen. God makes all our lives so much better. I pray everyday and the power God gets me through the day.

Barbara Goodman
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Ira Shafiroff

I am thrilled to welcome you to my blog, Brad. Thank you for reading and commenting. You may find my post, "Judaism, Deed Not Creed," of April 11, interesting. Here is the link. http://www.jesusandtheprofessor.com/2010/04/judaism-deed-not-creed.html#tp. I hope you will comment more! Ira

Ira Shafiroff

Thank you for reading my blog, Slot, and thank you especially for taking the time to comment! I hope you will comment more. Shalom! Ira

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Great blog and really great post. Going to read your other posts...

Brad Fallon

Wonderful blog! I never really thought of what Judaism is all about, what are their teachings. For me religion is not really that important. Faith in God is what makes me going with my spiritual life.

Ira Shafiroff

Wonderful! Thanks, Susan. Happy New Year. Ira

Susan Bowers

I'll keep you posted. :)

I will probably wait until after the New Year though.

Sue B

Ira Shafiroff

I think this would be a wondeful experience, Susan. As to which to attend, here are some things to consider (in my life, I have been a member at various times, of Orthdox, Conservative, and Reform synagogues):

If you want to get the best flavor of an ancient synagogue, the Orthdox branch would be best: men sit separately from women, all prayers are in Hebrew, there is no instumental music, and only men are rabbis. That said (and I am embarrased to state this), I do not know that you would be warmly welcomed there. Still, if available, it might be a great experience for you.

The Conservative synagogue would have most (if not all) of the prayers in Hebrew, although men and women sit together there now. Moreover, women are now rabbis in that movement.

The Reform and Reconstructionist movements are the most liberal branches within Judaism. There is more English language in the prayers. You may also have instrumental music in these synagogues.

All synagogues, whether Orthdox, Conservative, Reform, or Reconstructionist, will have a Hebrew chanting from the Torah scroll on Sabbath morning.

My suggestion is try all three in your area (Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist). Just call the rabbi, tell him or her that you are Unitarian, not interested in converting, but that you just want to see a Sabbath service, and if that would be possible. It should be no big deal. Perhaps you could share your experience here!

I hope this helps, Susan.

Take care.

Ira

Susan Bowers

I wasn't sure where to put this, but this seemed like the safest place to ask.

If I wanted to attend a Jewish service (perhaps a Friday Shabbat) with the intention of getting a feeling of what it would be to worship as Jesus would have worshipped, what would you recommend that I do? I ask this cautiously because living in the Bible belt of the south, I could easily understand any Jew being highly hesitant and suspicious of my motives. I would want to make it very clear that I would not be attending to cause trouble or rock their world. I would certainly not be wacking anyone over the head with a Bible or handing out tracks. My most sincere intention would be to learn and experience how Jesus worshipped, or at least as closely as possible.

There is a synogogue in my town that is conservative and there is one in a couple of towns over that is reformed, and then I also understand that there is a third one that considers themselves to be reconstructionists (female rabbis and so forth).

Would you recommend that I contact one of the local rabbis and make an appointment before going any further in my persuits?

Susan Bowers

Thank you. I put in the link and bookmarked it. :)

Ira Shafiroff

If you are interested, Susan, you can check out the Jewish Encyclopedia at www.jewishencyclopedia.com. It was originally published in 1906 and is now in the public domain. Although obviously dated, it remains unsurpassed for Jewish (and early Christian) history and theology. You may find the articles on Jesus, John the Baptist, New Testament, and other subjects most fascinating. Take care. Ira

Susan Bowers

Thank you for replying and nothing to forgive :). That's the great thing about the internet. One can post on their time and not be rushed.

I can also appreciate Judaism not attempting to convert the world LOL. I sometimes wish the Christians would realize the damage they do at times when they try to force or intimidate people into doing things that they do not fully understand. It often leads to people simply doing rituals on the surface without comprehending the meaning behind the teachings and doing what they need to do to change their hearts and lives which is often a lifetime process.

My husband and I recently became active in a Unitarian Universalist church in our town. It is tiny (roughly 90 members) but there is a wide diversity of people there: Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, Pagan and even a few who claim to be atheist. It makes for some interesting discussions to say the least and I am finding a freedom to explore my beliefs and to discover what I truly believe and what I was simply taught to believe. And, most importantly, we are accepted there as we are in our spiritual walk (my husband is a practicing Muskogee Native American and has had problems with other churches).

I have also been studying Hebrew. I enjoy watching the JLTV station. Sometimes, there will be a movie where the language spoken is Hebrew but will include English subtitles. I rejoice if I hear a word or a phrase in a conversation that I recognize. I also enjoy looking at labels in the grocery store and discovering more words that I recognize.

Take care,
Sue B

Ira Shafiroff

Welcome to my blog, Susan. (Forgive me, please, for not responding sooner.) People are starting to understand that Jesus was a Jew who lived and died like a Jew (the Romans actually crucified many Jews who were threats to them). So, thank you for reading this. I hope you will read, question, and challenge me--itself a tradition in Judaism. Also, please know that there is no attempt to convert here. As you may have seen in a prior post, Judaism does not attempt to convert. A fundamental teaching of the ancient rabbis is, "The righteous of all nations have a share in the World to Come." So please read, question, and enjoy! Thanks, and Shalom! Ira

Susan Bowers

I just found your blog. I am looking forward to reading it. I was hoping to find someone who was actually Jewish and willing to talk about Jesus, as apposed to a Christian minister who talks about the Jewishness of Jesus, but has a hidden agenda of proselytizing Jews. That has never been my intention.

I was raised in a Christian home, but left a number of years ago. I was finding it harder and harder to justify the teachings of the church with what Jesus taught (or rather what the Christian Bible says he taught). I realized at an early age that Jesus was NOT Christian, He was Jewish and worshipped and lived as a Jew. He did not have a New Testament to follow. He observed the Jewish holy days and never told anyone to change the Shabbat to the first day of the week. LOL

Dont get me wrong. I love Jesus and make every effort of follow his teachings. I just had to get away from the churches in order to find the truth.


Ira Shafiroff

Thank you very much, Greg, for reading my blog and for taking time to comment. I appreciate it, and hope you will be a regular visitor!

Ira

Greg West

Great idea for a blog, friend. I look foward to exploring this blog and reading future posts. I think the Jewishness of Jesus and Christianity is often overlooked by many Christians today.

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